Here Are the Potassium Levels of Foods that Might Be in Your Pantry…

Potassium is an important part of a person's health. However, a CKD patient like you may need to cut down on this nutrient, as you may well know.

In order to maintain good health without risking more damage to your kidneys, you need to keep to a daily potassium intake of 1,500-2,700 milligrams.

Check below for the list of some common foods and their potassium content to help you regulate your intake.

High-Potassium Food List

Food is considered high in potassium if it contains more than 200 mg per portion. Some of these are below, along with their potassium content in milligrams per serving indicated:

  • apricot (10 halves) = 407 mg
  • banana (1 pc) = 422 mg
  • cantaloupe (1 cup) = 427 mg
  • kiwi (1 medium-sized) = 240 mg
  • mango (1 medium-sized) = 325 mg
  • orange (1 pc) = 237 mg
  • orange juice (1/2 cup) = 235 mg
  • papaya (1 cup) = 255 mg
  • prunes (5 pcs) = 307 mg
  • prune juice (1/2 cup) = 370 mg
  • raisins (1/4 cup) = 270 mg
  • artichoke (1 cup) = 480 mg
  • squash (different kinds, 1 cup) = 296 mg
  • beets (1 cup) = 252 mg
  • Brussels sprouts (1 cup) = 450-495 mg
  • carrots (1 pc) = 230 mg
  • kale (1 cup) = 296-417 mg
  • kohlrabi (1 cup) = 561 mg
  • lentils (1 cup) = 731 mg
  • okra / ladyfingers (1 cup) = 216-339 mg
  • potatoes (1 pc) = 515 mg
  • pumpkin (1 cup) = 564 mg
  • tomato / tomato products (1 pc) = 292 mg
  • zucchini (1/2 cup) = 220 mg
  • beef (3 oz) = 246-270 mg
  • chicken (1/2 breast) = 254-281 mg
  • pork (3 oz) = 245 mg
  • salmon (3 oz) = 319 mg
  • turkey (dark meat, 3 oz) = 250 mg
  • milk (1 cup) = 322-366 mg
  • molasses (1 tbsp) = 295 mg
  • peanut butter (2 tbsp) = 210 mg
  • yogurt (6 oz) = 260-435 mg

These are the ones you should watch out the most, because it's easy to overshoot your potassium intake when eating these.

Note that some salt substitutes are also packed with potassium. It would be best to check the labels first, or ask a recommendation of salt substitutes from your dietitian or doctor.

Food with Medium Potassium Levels

There are food items with average amounts of potassium in them, containing between 50-200 mg per portion. However, you still need to be careful when eating these, as they can easily be overlooked and have a rather nasty effect on your kidneys when you eat too much.

  • avocado (1 oz) = 100-144 mg
  • apple (1 pc) = 148 mg
  • apple juice (1/2 cup) = 150 mg
  • blueberries (1 cup) = 112-138 mg
  • cherries (10 pcs) = 151 mg
  • grape (10 pcs) = 96 mg
  • grapefruit (1/2 of whole) = 166-175 mg
  • peach (1 pc) = 186 mg
  • pears (1 medium-sized) = 200 mg
  • pineapple (1/2 cup) = 100 mg
  • plums (1 pc) = 104 mg
  • raspberries (1 cup) = 186 mg
  • watermelon (limit to 1 cup) = 170 mg
  • asparagus (4 spears) = 124 mg
  • celery (1 stalk) = 107 mg
  • corn (1/2 cup) = 195 mg
  • cucumber (1/2 cup) = 80 mg
  • eggplant (1 cup) = 122 mg
  • green beans (1/2 cup) = 85-90 mg
  • lettuce (1 cup) = 78-109 mg
  • onion (1 whole) = 161 mg
  • spinach (1 leaf) = 56 mg
  • tofu (1/4 block) = 120 mg
  • coffee (6 fl.oz) = 54-87 mg
  • chocolate (1 1/2 oz) = 165 mg

Low-Potassium Food List

These foods only have potassium levels of 50 mg and below. These are most ideal for your diet, as there is little chance you can go overboard with these food items. Have a look; perhaps you'll be inspired to formulate a meal plan out of these?

Your FREE 3-Day Meal Plan is available here!

  • cranberries (1/2 cup) = 45 mg
  • cranberry juice cocktail = 20 mg
  • strawberries (1 pc) = 18 mg
  • broccoli (1 floweret) = 36 mg
  • cauliflower (1 floweret) = 39 mg
  • radish (1 pc) = 10 mg
  • flour/corn tortilla (1 pc) = 50 mg
  • waffle (4-inch size, 1 pc) = 50 mg
  • white bread (1 slice) = 30 mg
  • rice (1/2 cup) = 50 mg
  • cheese (1 oz) = 20-30 mg
  • noodles / pasta (1/2 cup) = 30 mg
  • tea (6 fl.oz) = 16 mg

With these food lists, hopefully, you'll be able to keep proper track of your daily potassium intake. At least, now you know which of your favorite foods probably aggravated your kidney condition, and which ones will help you take control of it.

But it's not just potassium you should watch out for. So click below to get your FREE Renal Cooking eBook to find more foods to eat and avoid within!

>

Start your own renal diet now with your FREE 3-Day Meal Plan eBook here!